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Meeting Details

Four Ways We Kill the SQL Server Plan Cache

Thu, Apr 28 2016 18:00 UTC

Four Ways We Kill the SQL Server Plan Cache

SQL Server’s plan cache is one of the largest regions of memory and is used to store all SQL queries and T-SQL code for quick execution. It is largely self-maintaining and self-tuning. However, the kind of queries you write and the way you invoke those queries can have an enormous impact on how the plan cache is maintained, tuned, and optimized. If you don’t do things right, you could end up shooting yourself in the foot and making performance much worse. Attend this demo-loaded session to learn about 4 harmful anti-patterns that developers frequently use without knowing their drawbacks.<BR> <BR> This session will answer questions like:<BR> - What’s currently in the plan cache?<BR> - How often is the code in my plan cache being reused?<BR> - Where are the big opportunities to save space in the plan cache?<BR> - What coding techniques are most likely to make my object recompile unnecessarily or cause SQL Server to cache inefficient query plans?<BR> <BR> There are a short list of mistakes that, if you know of them in advance, will make your life as a database developer much easier. Learn to avoid these four harmful anti-patterns which can slow down the plan cache. Learn how see what is in your SQL Server’s plan cache and how it is behaving. And embrace these recommended techniques to repair poorly performing queries or entirely avoid them in the first place. <BR>


Kevin Kline

Kevin Kline is a database and industry expert serving as Principal Program Manager at SentryOne, the industry leading SQL Server database tools vendor. A Microsoft SQL Server MVP since 2003, he is a founder and former president of PASS. Kevin is an author of many books, blogger, columnist, and popular international speaker. Kevin’s best known book is the best-selling SQL in a Nutshell and contributes monthly to Database Trends & Applications magazine. He tweets at @kekline and blogs at http://Blogs.SQLSentry.com/Author/KevinKline.

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